Bed Bugs Shed Their Skin

February 6, 2012 | By

Bed Bugs Shed Their Skin

As a snake does, bed bugs must molt or shed their skin to grow to the next stage of development (entomologists call these stages an “instar”) until they become adults. These shed skins are found in bed bug harborages and can be a tell tale sign of the presence of bed bugs.

By louento.pix

Recently molted adult bed bugs

The bug on top has its molted exoskeleton stuck on its body. It molted first: notice its darker brown coloration. Bug on bottom just recently molted: notice its paler, lighter coloration. Both bugs have blood from previous (5th instar nymph) stage still in their digestive tracts. Molting occurs when bug is physiologically ready. It doesn’t have to totally digest its current blood meal first. Newly molted adult females may be able to produce eggs and mate before their first adult blood meal. 1/4 inch squares.

Cimex Flakes – a bowl of sheds

Looks like a bowl of cereal flakes. Poured out shed skins and bugs from a bed bug rearing jar. Many months worth of exuviae. The live bugs also can be seen. In actual infestations bed bugs not only infest beds, furniture, etc., but also will live in piles of shed skins.

By louento.pix

 


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